COSTECH Integrated Repository

Mining-sector dynamics in an era of resurgent resource nationalism: Changing relations between large-scale mining and artisanal and small-scale mining in Tanzania

Show simple item record

dc.creator Pedersen, Rasmus H.
dc.creator Mutagwaba, Willison
dc.creator Jønsson, Jesper Bosse
dc.creator Schoneveld, George
dc.creator Jacob, Thabit
dc.creator Chacha, Maisory
dc.creator Wengh, Xiaoxue
dc.creator Njau, Maria G.
dc.date 2020-09-01T07:18:37Z
dc.date 2020-09-01T07:18:37Z
dc.date 2019
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-06T13:21:04Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-06T13:21:04Z
dc.identifier Pedersen, R. H., Mutagwaba, W., Jønsson, J. B., Schoneveld, G., Jacob, T., Chacha, M., ... & Njau, M. G. (2019). Mining-sector dynamics in an era of resurgent resource nationalism: Changing relations between large-scale mining and artisanal and small-scale mining in Tanzania. Resources Policy, 62, 339-346.
dc.identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.resourpol.2019.04.009
dc.identifier http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12661/2459
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12661/2459
dc.description Abstract. The full-text article is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resourpol.2019.04.009
dc.description Tanzania's mining sector has long been dominated by two opposing scales of operations, large-scale mining (LSM), and artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM). From the mid-1990s, changing governments promoted LSM as a key sector for the restructuring of the economy through the generation of much needed foreign capital and increased fiscal earnings. However, a gradual shift in policies towards facilitating ASM, linked to the re-emergence of resource nationalism over the last two decades, can be observed. The paper analyses three types of dynamics that have the potential to improve the lot of ASM in Tanzania, namely increased efforts to enforce ASM rights, stronger support programmes, and the emergence of medium-scale miners (MSM) linked to global value-chains with the potential to bridge the gap between ASM and LSM and promote upgrading. Recent resource nationalist legislation also has the potential to promote more pro-ASM business models. This points to the increased political leverage of the ASM sector, which supports people in their millions, driven by electoral politics. However, from an ASM perspective the development is not unambiguous. Registration of rights to some extent remains ‘paper formalization’, the implementation of support programmes has slowed down, and MSM has so far been dominated by investors from emerging markets in partnership with local elites. Experience suggests that the continued emphasis on the redistribution of rights and revenues from foreign LSM may end up benefitting larger domestic business interests and state coffers more than ASM.
dc.language en
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.subject Mining sector
dc.subject Large-scale mining
dc.subject Small-scale mining
dc.subject Resource nationalism
dc.subject Medium-scale miners
dc.subject Electoral politics
dc.subject Local elites
dc.subject Domestic business
dc.subject Business interests
dc.subject LSM
dc.subject SSM
dc.title Mining-sector dynamics in an era of resurgent resource nationalism: Changing relations between large-scale mining and artisanal and small-scale mining in Tanzania
dc.type Article


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search COSTECH


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account